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How can we reach our 2020
Greenest City Targets?

NorthShore

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  1. 146 votes
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    7 comments  ·  GC 2020 » Reduce waste  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    NorthShore supported this idea  · 
  2. 49 votes
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    Good idea! In the past few years, the City has installed 8 of 16 self-cleaning toilets as part of its street furniture contract with CBS-Decaux, and is looking for additional locations. (As an aside, locating them can be challenging due to limited public sidewalk space, a lack of utility connections, and concerns from adjacent businesses.) New public restrooms have also been installed as part of recent park upgrades. There is also a huge opportunity and need at transit interchanges, but this is outside the City’s jurisdiction — Vancouver has repeatedly requested (and will continue to ask) that TransLink install restrooms in its rapid transit stations.

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    NorthShore commented  · 

    i agree. go to Paris, Berlin and any more civilized city and they have public facilities. the modern ones are self cleaning. once you step out, it goes through a cleaning cycle and is sanitized for the next user.

    NorthShore supported this idea  · 
  3. 133 votes
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  4. 229 votes
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    Transit (and transit fares!) are controlled by TransLink, not the city. Having said that, reducing or eliminating transit fares is an interesting idea.

    Unfortunately it’s not very feasible, at least as TransLink is currently funded. Unlike most North American cities, Vancouver’s transit problems aren’t due to a lack of demand but rather a lack of capacity. Anyone who’s ever tried to squeeze onto one of our busy buses or trains knows this all too well — there isn’t enough space even when people have to pay, let alone accommodate the additional demand that would be created if transit were free. Compare this to cities with fare-free zones, which are typically struggling for increase demand, and which typically have (a) less frequent service and/or (b) plenty of extra capacity to accommodate more riders.

    In Vancouver, we need to provide more transit capacity to meet existing demand — and a LOT more…

    NorthShore supported this idea  · 

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