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How can we reach our 2020
Greenest City Targets?

Toby Barazzuol

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  1. 215 votes
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    7 comments  ·  GC 2020 » Encourage local food  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Toby Barazzuol supported this idea  · 
  2. 13 votes
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    Toby Barazzuol supported this idea  · 
  3. 16 votes
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    1 comment  ·  GC 2020 » Improve water quality  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Toby Barazzuol supported this idea  · 
  4. 226 votes
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    19 comments  ·  GC 2020 » Improve access to nature  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Toby Barazzuol supported this idea  · 
  5. 599 votes
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    18 comments  ·  GC 2020 » Encourage shorter vehicle trips  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

    This is an evolutionary process. The City of Vancouver is already considered a North American leader in this regard. Current and future plans and projects (e.g. Cambie Corridor Planning Program) will continue to embrace this ideal.

    Toby Barazzuol supported this idea  · 
  6. 49 votes
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    Good idea! In the past few years, the City has installed 8 of 16 self-cleaning toilets as part of its street furniture contract with CBS-Decaux, and is looking for additional locations. (As an aside, locating them can be challenging due to limited public sidewalk space, a lack of utility connections, and concerns from adjacent businesses.) New public restrooms have also been installed as part of recent park upgrades. There is also a huge opportunity and need at transit interchanges, but this is outside the City’s jurisdiction — Vancouver has repeatedly requested (and will continue to ask) that TransLink install restrooms in its rapid transit stations.

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    Toby Barazzuol commented  · 

    This is a great idea and definitely on topic! Sustainability is largely about livability, and if we're asking people to spend more time on the streets either biking or walking, then we need the appropriate support facilities throughout the city.

    Where I live and work, in the Downtown Eastside, there is a dreadful lack of public washrooms. So much so that every day dozens of people are forced to relieve themselves on the streets, in driveways and in doorways. It's unacceptable in terms of human dignity and in the health hazards that it creates for everyone. In many ways, it's worse than many undeveloped countries I've visited.

    The City needs to provide more public washrooms in some capacity. If they can't be standalone washrooms, then work in partnership with social housing to make their washrooms available publicly.

    Toby Barazzuol supported this idea  · 
  7. 229 votes
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    Transit (and transit fares!) are controlled by TransLink, not the city. Having said that, reducing or eliminating transit fares is an interesting idea.

    Unfortunately it’s not very feasible, at least as TransLink is currently funded. Unlike most North American cities, Vancouver’s transit problems aren’t due to a lack of demand but rather a lack of capacity. Anyone who’s ever tried to squeeze onto one of our busy buses or trains knows this all too well — there isn’t enough space even when people have to pay, let alone accommodate the additional demand that would be created if transit were free. Compare this to cities with fare-free zones, which are typically struggling for increase demand, and which typically have (a) less frequent service and/or (b) plenty of extra capacity to accommodate more riders.

    In Vancouver, we need to provide more transit capacity to meet existing demand — and a LOT more…

    Toby Barazzuol supported this idea  · 
  8. 27 votes
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    10 comments  ·  GC 2020 » Create green jobs  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

    This idea will be included in the draft Greenest City Action Plan. A Green Enterprize Zone team is establishing an area and some initial projects including two business incubators, specific infrastructure and demonstration projects.

    Toby Barazzuol supported this idea  · 
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    Toby Barazzuol commented  · 

    Though it's true that the whole city should be a green zone, it seems more manageable to focus on smaller communities first to learn what works. As Saul mentioned, we are trying to develop the Strathcona Green Zone as a sustainable precinct of collaborative, progressive businesses. However even within this relatively small area of 60 square blocks, it has been challenging.
    At the very least, green zones should provide services that allow companies to be "more green" - things like comprehensive recycling, zero-emissions couriers to facilitate the movement of goods, and easy access to grants or incentives for building or efficiency upgrades.
    Beyond that, its important that these areas are planned and managed as ecosytems that contain businesses, artists and residents - changes affecting one group will affect other groups. Too often these decisions are made in silos, so we need to approach these zones with full systems thinking.
    More creative zoning and flexibility in land use is one of the biggest ways that the city can help. That, and grants or tax breaks for organizations investing in improving the built environment.
    There are no easy answers as we are all learning as we go, however now is definitely the time for creativity, vision and leadership.

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