How can we reach our 2020
Greenest City Targets?

How can we reach our 2020 Greenest City targets?

Turn existing "bike streets" into proper separated bike routes

The network of bike streets is a great start, but drivers aggressively squeeze cyclists close to parked cars, increasing the risk of accident. Create physically separated bike lanes on these routes - perhaps by getting rid of one or both sides of street parking. (Or forbidding driving altogether on those routes!)

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    Elle Zed shared this idea  ·   ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    under review  ·  AdminGreenest City Planning Team (Admin, CG2020) responded  · 

    Thanks for sharing this idea!

    The city’s new active transportation plan will soon be in development, and hopefully completed within the next year.

    A big part of the work ahead is to identify the complete cycling network, and the type of facility that is most appropriate and/or feasible for different routes. In some cases (e.g. busy arterial routes), separated lanes might be the best approach; in other cases (e.g. lower car volume neighbourhood streets), enhanced traffic calming and/or further reducing car access might be more appropriate. Travis cited some great examples in the Netherlands where cars are ‘guests’ that are allowed in, but do not dominate.

    In all cases, the goal should be to make routes that feel safe to all potential cyclists, including beginners, children, and seniors.

    For more information, visit http://vancouver.ca/cycling .

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      • Paul @ City of Vancouver commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Thanks for sharing this idea!

        The city's new 10-year cycling program master plan will soon be in development, and hopefully completed within the next year.

        A big part of the work ahead is to identify the complete cycling network, and the type of facility that is most appropriate and/or feasible for different routes. In some cases (e.g. busy arterial routes), separated lanes might be the best approach; in other cases (e.g. lower car volume neighbourhood streets), enhanced traffic calming and/or further reducing car access might be more appropriate. Travis cited some great examples in the Netherlands where cars are 'guests' that are allowed in, but do not dominate.

        In all cases, the goal should be to make routes that feel safe to all potential cyclists, including beginners, children, and seniors.

        For more information, visit http://vancouver.ca/cycling .

      • Travis Martin commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        The first step should be to turn major bike routes such as 7th/8th and 10th Avenues into a series of opposing one-way streets to accommodate only local motorists that live on the block. With that change or soon after, parking should be reduced to one side and bike lanes marked accordingly in each direction (with a buffer to the opening of car doors).

        The Netherlands is a prime example of making the cars a guest on certain bike streets. Bike lanes are given the majority of space on either side of the street and marked with a broken line. Depending on the street the 'car' portion of the road isn't wide enough for cars to pass each other/or on a one way street, to pass a cyclist without entering one of the cyclist lanes. By making the cars enter the cyclist's domain it fosters greater awareness and sensible driving.

      • Maia Love commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Even better, do what Seattle did, and turn bike routes into roads for bikes only. There are enough roads to detour around these bike routes in most locations. For example, in Kitsilano, between Burrard and McDonald, the bike route street does not need to be used by cars.

      • vim commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Oh dear, how terrible for you......it is really not nice to have to live above idling cars created by Vancouver's 4% cyclists who demand bike lanes that tie up traffic access to bridges, and demand that separated bike lanes work for their immature selfish needs. We all want Green but let's do it sensibly. The City is listening and caving to a few residents (cylists) who are young (ish) while ignoring good sensible design. Cycling is not the only way to become GREEN. This such a juvenile approach.

      • Janine Brossard commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Great idea Elle. It's not very pleasant when biking uphill with my daughter on the back of my bike and a car speeds by. It feels unhealthy to breathe their exhaust fumes so deeply into my lungs for the next few minutes.

      • Trevor commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        This wouldn't be necessary everywhere, but just off the top of my head I think of 37th west of Arbutus. With parking on both sides of the street it's not wide enough for cars to pass each other, and barely wide enough for a car and bike to pass.

      • fred commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Having dedicated bike routes on separate streets parallel to major arteries. Keeping cars only on the major arteries and bikes only on bike paths. Have barriers and yield signs, so they don't need to break any laws for not stopping at stop signs and pedestrian light at major crossings.

      • Jimmy commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Also reduce the widths of these streets and even plant trees and greenery in these streets with the new space. the remaining space for bikes I would love to have them be lined with brick or stone that has space in between thus allowing rain water to drain slowly into the ground reducing storm water run off and helping to refill our water aquifers in the ground. Also this takes pressure off the storm water system.

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